TUCHO

Arrived Shanghai in 2003, TuCho has switched his profession from a lawyer to an interior designer, urged by his love for the arts. Brought up by parents who devoted to art patronage and antique collecting, and guided by Madam Song, who is renowned as the trail blazer of Chinese fashion industry in the 80s, TuCho’s reawakening moment has come after 12 years of searching and collecting some of the finest pieces of traditional Chinese robes. Hence the silk sculpture.

Over the past 12 years, TuCho has been meticulously accumulating both intact and fragments of Ming and Qing dynasty silk robes worn by the aristocrats. TuCho felt the need to provide a second lease on life to the historical pieces by conceptualizing the incomplete pieces as a whole.

Collaborating with the Chinese calligrapher Master Luo, ink on paper unified with embroidery and silk as artistic robes composed of mixed media. By conflating the raw material of the physical cocoons with the pieces of the unfinished robes and mulberry paper, TuCho has created his own hand sculptures that can be “read” as paintings.

As silkworms must feed on the mulberry leaves to spin the silk, the mulberry paper thereby symbolizes the temporal link between the raw and the finished piece. The culmination represents a personal expression that juxtaposes the natural and the man-made, the history of the bygone era with the contemporary moment and the visions of former artisans with that of the present artist.

Arrived Shanghai in 2003, TuCho has switched his profession from a lawyer to an interior designer, urged by his love for the arts. Brought up by parents who devoted to art patronage and antique collecting, and guided by Madam Song, who is renowned as the trail blazer of Chinese fashion industry in the 80s, TuCho’s reawakening moment has come after 12 years of searching and collecting some of the finest pieces of traditional Chinese robes. Hence the silk sculpture.

Over the past 12 years, TuCho has been meticulously accumulating both intact and fragments of Ming and Qing dynasty silk robes worn by the aristocrats. TuCho felt the need to provide a second lease on life to the historical pieces by conceptualizing the incomplete pieces as a whole.

Collaborating with the Chinese calligrapher Master Luo, ink on paper unified with embroidery and silk as artistic robes composed of mixed media. By conflating the raw material of the physical cocoons with the pieces of the unfinished robes and mulberry paper, TuCho has created his own hand sculptures that can be “read” as paintings.

As silkworms must feed on the mulberry leaves to spin the silk, the mulberry paper thereby symbolizes the temporal link between the raw and the finished piece. The culmination represents a personal expression that juxtaposes the natural and the man-made, the history of the bygone era with the contemporary moment and the visions of former artisans with that of the present artist.