If you have been questioning yourself whether to go see the latest group exhibition at Art+ Shanghai Gallery In Between Days IX: Works from the Gallery Collection, the answer is – undoubtedly – YES!

“In Between Days” is the ninth edition of the summer group exhibition series run annually at Art+ Shanghai. The series has been created almost nine years ago by the gallery founders as there was an increasing, almost an urgent demand to showcase new works from a progressively growing stable of gallery artists at that time.

First edition of  “In Between Days” in 2011 at Art+ Shanghai Gallery (at 22 Fumin Road)

Currently, there are about thirty artists that the gallery represents, meaning that all of these artists are continuously creating new series of works, developing new concepts, evolving and polishing their skills, trying new materials, and experimenting with new ideas.

There are roughly five to six exhibitions the gallery can hold annually, most of which are solo and duo exhibitions. Simple mathematical calculation tells you that there is an absolute need for group shows like this to keep the public informed about the latest breakthroughs and news from the artists.

The series of the In Between Days: Piece by Piece news posts is to discover the stories each piece of artwork on view contains.

First, we are going to have a closer look at the works by one of the most established artists of the gallery Wang Haichuan. For the ninth edition of In Between Days, the artist presents two new paintings on canvas and an installation composed of two wooden doors.

In Between Days IX exhibition view: On the left: Door 7#A, Door 7#B, mixed media on wooden doors, 185 x 90 cm (each), 2019; on the right: Tale of the City, mixed media on canvas, 180 x 200 cm, 2018

Wang Haichaun’s collaboration with Art+ Shanghai Gallery started in early 2017. The first showcase of his works at the gallery in February that year was accompanied by an insightful talk on his artistic career moderated by an Art Historian Julie Chun.

Wang Haichuan’s first appearance  works on view at Art+ Shanghai Gallery as a part of the group exhibition “Beyond the Border” (January 2017)

The showcase at the gallery has coincided with Wang Haichuan’s appearance at the 11th Shanghai Biennial 2016 with a large installation of assembled furniture pieces entitled “Tongyuanju: Seven Days”.

Installation view of Wang Haichaun’s installation “Tongyuanju: Seven Days” at the 11th Shanghai Biennial

Soon enough his first solo exhibition at the gallery The Fortuitous Encounter of a Sewing Machine and an Umbrella on a Dissecting Table curated by a Beijing Art Historian Kang Xueru followed. During the time Wang Haichuan’s solo exhibition was held at Art+ Shanghai Gallery, his furniture creations have also participated in the Shanghai International Furniture Fair. This quick overview of Wang Haichuan’s past two years appearances in Shanghai is only a fragment from the long list of exhibitions, biennials, and residency programs that he has participated in throughout China and the world. You can learn more about Wang Haichuan’s exhibition history on his artist’s page here.

“The Fortuitous Encounter of a Sewing Machine and an Umbrella on a Dissecting Table” Wang Haichuan Solo Exhibition View at Art+ Shanghai Gallery (September – October 2017)

Exhibition view of Wang Haichuan’s “Her Universe” installation at the 23rd Shanghai International Furniture Expo (September 2017)

Two years since Wang Haichuan’s works are debuted in the gallery, and now his new works – two paintings on canvas and installation of two wooden doors – are back to Shanghai for the ninth edition of In Between Days.

If you have seen Wang Haichuan’s works before, you will surely recognize his painterly language regardless of the surface that he chooses to work on. Whether executed on canvas, wooden doors, windows, or trunks of trees, his paintings are unified in their eclectic imagery, irregular visual structures, and defiance of the normal and conventional.

Wang Haichuan, Diary 1, mixed media on recycled windows, 102 x 125 cm, 2017

Wang Haichuan, Pagoda, mixed media on black-and-white photograph and wooden panel, 81 x 61 cm, 2018

Wang Haichuan, Landscape, Acrylic on Tibetan paper, 51 x 77 cm, 2015

You might think his works lack logical coherence we are accustomed to seeing in our everyday life. Alongside portions of architecture, we notice silent and extensive smears of paint, peculiar graphic patterns besides disjointed forms and floating landscapes. People, animals, birds, flowers, household items are positioned next to the depictions of ancient murals, religious scenes, recent news stories, and legends from the western and eastern worlds.

Wang Haichuan, The Tale of the City, mixed media on canvas, 180 x 200 cm, 2018 (currently on view through August 31st, 2019)

Wang Haichuan, In the Wild, mixed media on canvas, 150 x 150 cm, 2018 (currently on view through August 31st, 2019)

Wang Haichuan navigates, sources and compiles a vast collection of imagery from high and mass culture, from figurative and abstract, to the most mundane, religious and out-of-the-ordinary.
The artist begins from individual sensory experiences to record and expand on minute details, individual emotions, and memories of the everyday. He interweaves reality, dreams, and metaphors into the discourse of his painting. But what he also sees as an essential part of his image-sourcing practice is the collection of discarded images that he picks up and utilizes for his visual narration. Everyday images are being produced, commoditized, stored and circulated on an unprecedented scale. Never ever has the world been so overloaded with images as today. Some of them remain private, while others are made public and even carry the potential to change the course of global events. But with such a high rate of image production, like in any other kind of manufacturing, the waste of materials is unavoidable. People cannot help but create ephemeral images that are soon to be discarded. Forgotten, unwanted, ‘deleted’, they acquire a new life, identity, and purpose once they enter the frame of Wang Haichuan’s work. Painting allows Wang Haichuan to construct a kind of atmosphere that lets the viewer escape the chaos of reality and enter a perfectly ordered world within a work of art. Indeed, his works possess a “fable” character that uses descriptions of non-words to hush the clamor of spoken language.

Surrealistic as they are, his works set a great search for meaning, as they involve the viewer in the quest where the questions are as important as answers. The artist actively challenges our preconditioned perception of reality and most importantly our experience of viewing an art piece. He encourages us to get actively involved in the process of interpretation, questioning and creating our own meaning.

Wang Haichuan, The Doors 7#A, 7#B, mixed media on a wooden door, 185 x 90 cm, 2019 (currently on view through August 31st, 2019)

Various found objects like pieces of furniture, textiles, tiles, black-and-white photographs, window frames, and doors are also a part of Wang Haichuan’s collage of ideas.

The practice of artistic upcycling of images and objects goes back to his earlier work in Tongyuanju, former Chongqing Copper Cash Manufactory. What became known as the Tongyuanju project, that has significantly influenced the course of Wang Haichuan’s artistic career, initially started in 2010 as an art education program.

 

The Gray Period

To understand the complexity and the significances of the Tongyuanju project on Wang Haichuan consequent artistic practice, however, one needs to rewind two years back and look at the year of 2007 when Wang Haichuan had closed his architectural and landscape design company and taken up painting again after many years of running his creative business.

At that time Wang Haichuan focused his artistic exploration on architectural forms of residential compounds, building façades, portions of courtyards, polished up gardens, and areas of constrained landscapes meticulously designed by people. His paintings were executed in oil in subdued cold shades of grays and blues. The portrayed scenes were devoid of any human presence; his architectural compounds appeared perfect, but also abandoned and a little ghostly. The architectural style of the buildings reminded of villas in the Mediterranean and expensive compounds in North America or Japan. In truth, many of those buildings that appeared on his paintings were much like the requests he used to receive from the clients when working in the field of architecture and landscape design. In the artist’s own words, they were “rootless structures”, alienated from the traditions of Chinese living.

Wang Haichuan, Fountain, oil on canvas, 150 x 250 cm, 2011

Those series of works reflected Wang Haichuan’s criticism of the new foreign looking urban landscapes that sprouted in the country after the introduction of the market economy, but more importantly they have expressed the artist’s resentment of a new lifestyle that many Chinese people adopted after thoughtlessly and instantaneously casting away their own cultural origins. In the absence of a better way to express their newly acquired wealth and influence, the nouveau riche demonstrated their new status with outlandish real-estate properties that borrowed identities from western prototypes but lacked their own authenticity. Wang Haichuan’s refined depictions of soulless and deserted structures that resembled stage decorations contained artist’s protest against superficiality, ignorance, and lack of cultural judgment.

Encounter with Tongyuanju

In 2009, Wang Haichuan introduced a new subject matter to his works that was a vivid juxtaposition to the perfect villas and polished up gardens of his previous series. The artist turned to portray deteriorating residences that were bound to be demolished as a part of an ambitious urbanization process. Those were the typical building structures that mushroomed during the active industrialization era in the 1960-70s around China. That was when old staff dormitories of Tongyuanju were captured in Wang Haichuan’s paintings for the first time. The lifestyle of the former factory’s employees that did not change despite the rapid transformations in the country, the communal style of living that was still exercised, and the sheer bits of history and collective memory that the walls of Tongyuanju have preserved, contained great value and interest for Wang Haichuan and had subsequently stimulated the artist to engage into a deeper conversation with the local population.

Wang Haichuan, Tongyuanju, oil on canvas, 168 x 300 cm, 2010

Wang Haichuan admits that on the preliminary steps his interest in Tongyuanju mainly stemmed out of concern for the poor and marginalized group of people that populated it. Therefore, the initial interaction took a form of art educational tutorials that welcomed everyone from the local community to participate, create and exhibit their works of art in various media. The short-term art workshop series represented by the project of Tongyuanju turned into an ongoing and profound conversation through different activities between the residents and artists from Chongqing and abroad. For Wang Haichuan, it particularly took a form of a social intervention that examined how social systems and certain living environments had the potential to structure people’s entire nature and prefabricate their behaviors and responses to certain situations.

Expanding Horizons

Wang Haichuan’s artistic interest in the Tongyuanju encouraged him to experiment with new media. He saw numerous limitations in painting when it came to expressing new ideas and experiences that he had encountered during his work with Tongyuanju community. He became particularly drawn to working with installation as an alternative artistic dimension, “an upgraded version of the painting” that he could relate more to architecture.

Wang Haichuan’s engagement with the Tongyuanju community also resulted in a number of exhibitions that eventually led to his installation “Tongyuanju: Seven Days” being selected for the aforementioned 11th Shanghai Biennale in 2016.

If feels like Wang Haichuan’s idea of “unwanted” images that he has collected for the creation of numerous of his recent paintings is deeply rooted in the idea of unwanted furniture that he has collected for his installation, but more importantly, in the idea of ‘unwanted’ people that were left behind once priorities changed. In fact, one of the stimulus to create the installation “Seven Days” (along with other furniture installation pieces) was of a deeply spiritual nature, as the artist wanted to provide the local residents with space, a ‘shrine’ where they can complain, reflect and pour out their concerns and disappointments in utter privacy.

Wang Haichuan’s practice of collecting “discarded items” gives them a new identity, purpose, and life. This way the artist is able to create a new alternative ending to the stories that otherwise could pass into oblivion.

This practice of collecting and reviving old images and found objects continues into the present day. The Door series that are a part of In Between Days IX were picked up from the nearest demolition sight next to Wang Haichuan’s studio. “I thought there should be a lot of stories behind those doors, so I took them and painted on them”, – remembers Wang Haichuan.

Two paintings on canvas that are also currently on view “In the Wild” and “Tale of the City”, are painted over his older works from the “gray period”.

 

 

 

 

 

Art+ Shanghai Gallery had an incredible honor to host Spanish cellist Sergi Boadella and German violinist Daniel Hauptmann performing a combination of 12 compositions for cello and violin by J.S. Bach on February 20th and 21st. The 2-evening concert was an event of unprecedented significance. Never before have six Suites for cello solo and six sonatas and partitas for violin solo have been programmed together in one concert in China.

Sergi Boadella and Daniel Hauptmann share friendship and love for Bach’s music for more than 30 years. After many years of interpreting these pieces separately they have decided to string together to climb the highest peaks of Art.

The 6 Suites for solo cello by J.S. Bach are the best and most difficult pieces ever written for this instrument, and his 6 Sonatas and Partitas for violin are undoubtedly the summit of the violin repertoire.

In July 1720, when Bach returned to Cöthen after accompanying his prince on a long journey, he found that his beloved Maria Barbara, mother of 7 children, was dead and buried. This has triggered a big personal crisis that was reflected in the creation of 12 works for violin and cello solo.

In this kind of intimate diary, Bach expresses himself about life and death. About God and humanity. About his life with the extraordinary woman that was Maria Barbara.
The twelve compositions are full of mystery. The pleasure and pain of existence are interspersed with Bach’s mysticism and religious devotion.

Gangwon Province marks the first anniversary of the Winter Olympics and Paralympics in Pyeongchang.

A series of events were dedicated to the celebration of 1st Olympic anniversary in a number of cities including concerts and cultural events.

On Sunday, February 9th, an event dedicated to the Olympic fashion was staged at the SK Handball Stadium at the Olympic Park in Jamsil, Seoul. The show featured Keysook Geum’s wearable pieces of art made of beads and wires created especially for the placard bearers who took part in the Parade of the Nations during the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics Opening Ceremony precisely one year ago.

 

A Chinese contemporary artist Huang Yulong, whom Art+ Shanghai Gallery has the honor to represent for more than ten years, has collaborated with a Hong Kong superstar Andy Lau on a sculpture entitled “Share the Love.”

Andy Lau is working on the hand heart gesture for the collaborative piece “Share the Love”  (image courtesy sohu.com)

An actor, film producer, singer, lyricist, and perhaps one of the most successful Hong Kong film actors since the mid-1980s, Andy has acted in more than 160 movies, while at the same time  managing a successful career as a pop singer and entering the Guinness World Records for the “Most Awards won by a Cantopop (Cantonese pop music) Male Artist”. In this creative collaboration, two artists Huang Yulong and Andy Lau have come together in hopes to remind people of the importance of facing the world with understanding, kindness, and love.

 (image courtesy sohu.com)

Entitled “Share the Love” the sculpture portrays two figures of a man and a child in Yulong’s signature hooded sweatshirts. The sculptures have acquired a unique element, a gesture of a hand heart, sculpted by Andy Lau.  The gesture that became popular among young generation thanks to the musicians and singers has been appropriated to act as a reminder of carrying love, care, and generosity wherever one goes. The message that the two artists are spreading through their collaborative work is meant to appeal to adults and children alike.

The Sculpture “Share the Love” collaboratively created by Huang Yulong and Andy Lau (image courtesy sohu.com)

Artist Huang Yulong (image courtesy Art+ Shanghai Gallery and the artist)

The sculpture will be on view today Saturday, December 15th at the at Hong Kong Coliseum during Andy Lau’s concert as he will be launching his world tour “My Love Andy Lau World Tour.” 

Stay tuned to keep track of the latest works and new exciting projects of our artists.

This year Art+ Shanghai Gallery participates in the 18th edition of the Luxury Property Showcase (LPS) Shanghai that will take place at the Shanghai Exhibition Center from Friday, December 7th to Sunday, December 9th.

We are looking forward to seeing you tomorrow during the Exclusive Art Collection Preview on Saturday, December 8th from 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM.

Since 2010, LPS is China’s ultimate platform for luxury property. With several shows per year, the expo brings the world’s most prestigious luxury real estate and lifestyle brands under one roof for the most elite clientele.

This year’s edition will display the upscale fashion and jewelry assortment, beauty and healthcare products, high-end vacation trip offers, antique items and magnificent pieces of art. Leading experts in the relevant industries will be on site to assist and consult on the best products and services catered to the most unique needs and demanding tastes.

It is the first year Art+ Shanghai Gallery collaborates with the LPS Shanghai, with curiosity and excitement we are looking forward to participating in this event and we hope you will join us to celebrate a refined and tasteful living.

There is something very similar between possessing a work of art and a piece of precious jewelry: each is inherently unique creation born of talent, skill and refined craftsmanship. Regardless of its material cost, it is often a strong and intimate emotion along with special memories that define a real value for the person who possesses them. It is for this reason, Art+ Shanghai Gallery opened its doors to a beautiful collection of precious gems stones from the Pink Diamonds Boutique.

Guided by a French gemologist Nicolas Jouvenceau, we have traveled to a mesmerizing world of rare colored diamonds to learned how to appreciate its true value and beauty.

The dessert chef hired especially for this event drew inspiration from the shapes and colors of precious gem stones.

Kenny (Meng Changqing), Kilo (Wang Xu) and Shin Tomono (from left to right) China’s hip-hop dance stars with almost 15 years of dance experience 

Chen Xuanrong’s and Huang Yulong’s vibrant art pieces exhibited during the show Altered State: Deciphering Urban in the Art of Chen Xuanrong and Huang Yulong have inspired a hip-hop themed event at the gallery on Tuesday, December 4th. In hopes to trace back the origins of hip-hop culture and street art in China we screened the documentary film “Spray Paint Beijing” on the expanding graffiti art scene in the capital of China and invited some of the pioneers of hip-hop movement and hip-hop dance in China to talk about this cultural phenomenon and learn some hip-hop moves!

Spray Paint Beijing Documentary Cover. The full-length film is available for purchase online on Amazon.com

“Spray Paint Beijing” is recognized as one of the most important documentaries ever made on graffiti art in China. Created by an American Director and Producer Lance Crayon it was released in 2013. The film captures a rapidly developing street art scene in the capital of China in the last years of Hu Jintao’s presidency. It traces back the very origins of graffiti in the capital of China, beginning with the story of Zhang Dali, a pioneer of street art in China and shows the life of various graffiti artists and artists crews working and creating in Beijing.

Determined to fill the space of the gallery with the sounds, flows, and movements of hip-hop culture, we have invited some of the pioneers of the hip-hop in China.

After a short talk with Kilo (real name Wang Xu) and Kenny (Meng Changqing) on the arrival of hip-hop to China back in the mid-1980s, we then had a chance to see two of them dancing. The winners of the numerous national and international dance competitions in the past, they are now heading the  World Dance Council (WDC) Street Dance Committee of China, with Wang Xu as the President and Meng Changqing as the Vice-President.

One of the gallery guests that evening happened to be Shin Tomono, a Chinese television dance star with an international background and 15 years of professional dance experience, he has joined Kenny and Kilo on the dance floor for a battle, and it was on!

The link to watch their performance will be available soon so stay tuned!

During the opening of the duo exhibition, Altered State: Deciphering Urban in the Art of Chen Xuanrong and Huang Yulong guests, artists, and the gallery team have collectively created a painting that we titled “Legal Wall.”

The painting’s title “Legal Wall” originates from the street art terminology. Given that in most countries graffiti is seen as an illegal act of vandalism, the term legal wall refers to the wall on which street artists have been permitted by a property owner or city administration to paint. Usually, a large mural appears on such walls.

With quick sweeping brushstrokes Chen Xuanrong outlined the setting of a public bathroom, with mirrors and walls to be soon covered by the outcries of public opinions. He then put the brush down and let the rest of the work to be done by the “public.”

In the spirit, true to the street art, everyone who has attended the opening was free to pick up a brush and paint anything that one’s creative soul demanded. Different messages in different languages from people of all ages and nationalities started to fill up the canvas. As if the mirror of the city’s subconsciousness, the canvas revealed what is on the city’s mind.

The Spanish cellist Sergi Boadella once again graced Art+ Shanghai Gallery with cello concert on Wednesday, June 13th. He performed pieces by a prolific Czech composer of cello music David Popper, Italian cellist and composer Carlo Alfredo Piatti, as well as compositions by a genius musician Johann Sebastian Bach. He finished the concert with an emotional perfomance of a piece by a Spanish composer Gaspar Cassado. Sergi played on a cello made by Martino Hell, Genova (Italy) 1700 and a bow made by Dominique Peccatte, Mirecourt (France) 1845. An 11-year-old cellist and a musical prodigi Matthew Kalani Liu, joined him at Art+ Shanghai Gallery for a recital.

Sergi Boadella has been living in China since 2011. For the past seven years he has performed and taught extensively throughout China. He has taught master classes at the Conservatories of Beijing, Dalian, Chengdu, Shenyang, Harbin, and Shenzhen among others and performed as soloist with the Hunan, Harbin, and Daqin symphony orchestras. While in China, he helped developed the new Cassadó Cello Strings at the Xinghai Fuyin String Factory in Beijing. Recently, he explored a novel playing experience with the BICO (Beijing International Chamber Orchestra) and the Dunshan Wind Symphony Orchestra as the soloist, which aroused intensive attention from audience. Besides, he plays with the Beijing Axis Ensemble which were invited to perform in many important stages across China.

Mr. Boadella began his cello studies with Lluís Claret in Barcelona (Spain), continued his studies with Cristian Florea at Musikhochschule Trossingen in Germany, and finished his training as a pupil of Marçal Cervera. He won the 2nd prize in the JJMM Young Musicians Competition of Spain in 1990 and graduated from Guildhall School in London with distinction. Further studies include courses with Bernard Greenhouse, Michael Flaksman, Maud Tortelier, Anner Bylsma, and Christophe Coin.

For more than 15 years he has had the enormous privilege to be the assistant teacher and collaborator of master Marçal Cervera , student of Gaspar Cassado and Paul Tortelier. He has taught at the Balearic Islands Conservatory, Valencia Internacional University, and at the International Courses of Ripoll, Tarrega, Denia, Cartagena, Camprodon and Tortosa.

Mr. Boadella has had performed in Spain, Germany, France, Italy, Switzerland, Portugal, Tunisia, Taiwan and Mainland China. He has served as principal cellist of the Palau de la Música Catalana Chamber Orchester in Barcelona, and has been a member of JONDE (Youth National Orchestra of Spain), the Kammerorchester Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany), the Catalan Chamber Orchestra, the Barcelona Symphony Orchestra and the Castilla y León Symphony Orchestra.

On May 17th, Art+ Shanghai Gallery held the screening of “China: Another Face”, a documentary shot by a famous French journalist Sylvie Levey. The screening was organized to facilitate a more profound discussion on the subjects of beauty and its perception raised by another talented French woman, an artist and photographer Corinne Mariaud in her solo exhibition at Art+ Shanghai Gallery “Fake i Real Me”.

“China: Another Face” tells incredible stories of young Chinese girls… and boys in their 20s and their fascination for plastic surgery. A 26-minute documentary, filmed at the famous Shanghai Hospital No. 9, was first aired by one of the French television channels FRANCE 3 in the program “Des Racines & des Ailes”.

Sylvie is a Sinologist and a free-lance consultant who dedicates most of her time to find opportunities to bridge China and the world. Based in China since 1999, she has lived in more than 25 different provinces. With the background of a journalist and filmmaker, Sylvie has directed a number of documentaries mainly focusing on social issues for French television channels France 2, France 3 and ARTE, among others. Many of her documentaries won various awards, and have been broadcasted in different languages all over the world.

This spring Art+ Shanghai Gallery is collaborating  with R. Sanderson – a high-end accessory brand, to create a unique multidisciplinary experience and satisfy your need for fashion and art.

R · SANDERSON is the ultra-luxury house of Rupert Sanderson London, distinguished by the unique hand-gilded 24-carat gold leaf heels and accessories. Exquisitely handmade in Bologna, Italy, each creation embodies century-old Italian craftsmanship and contemporary British flair.

A specialist gilding technique invented by the Brand, Crystalline™ is performed entirely in-house by artisans to create artistic finishes never-before-seen in the history of shoemaking. British designer Rupert Sanderson founded his eponymous luxury shoes label in 2001 after working in Italy for Sergio Rossi and Bruno Magli. Sanderson has been awarded ‘Accessory Designer of the Year’ by the British Fashion Council.

For the first time, R · SANDERSON launches a pop-up store in Shanghai from 7th  April till 15th June 2018, bringing its unique and artistic innovations to China’s most renowned international metropolis. Alongside the Brand’s exquisite heels and accessories in signature 24K gold leaf, a carefully curated art programe, in association with Art+ Shanghai Gallery, featuring original works by contemporary Chinese artists, such as Ye Hongxing, Shen Hua, Hu Weiqi and Zhang Zhenxue are on on view at the pop-up to delight shoe and art lovers with a multidimensional experience.

The R · SANDERSON pop-up store is at the stunning atrium on the ground level of Plaza 66, Shanghai, between 7th April and 15th June , 2018.

Art+ Shanghai Gallery has once again joined Art Central Hong Kong, the fair that is becoming one of the most important art events in the Asia Pacific.

Reportedly, the 2018 edition of Art Central had its highest ever attendance, welcoming 39,041 international collectors, curators and art enthusiasts. The fair showcased striking works from across the globe alongside a critically acclaimed programme, featuring performance, talks, large scale installations and new media.

Art+ Shanghai Gallery’s participation in the fair always focuses on the promotion of the artists across all media who produce works of impeccable quality and originality, whose artistic practice questions the contemporaneity, the self, the others but more importantly who focus on making their art a vital and meaningful part of people’s life. An array of works that Art+ Shanghai Gallery showcased at the to the 4th edition of Art Central demonstrated the magnitude of creative thought, the diversity and complexity of ideas of Chinese emerging and established artists that the gallery represents.

In total, the gallery exhibited the works of nine artists working in a range of different media including porcelain, crystal, stainless steel, acrylic, oil painting, stickers, Tibetan paper, among many others. The highlights of Art+ Shanghai Gallery’s booth this year included porcelain works presented by two young artists Tan Danwu and Liu Xi who have recently joined the gallery and who made their debut at this edition of Art Central.

Another debutant of Art Central 2018 and a new addition to the Art+ Shanghai Gallery family is a young Beijing-based artist Chen Xuanrong, also known as Roy. His two-by-three-meter oil on canvas graffiti piece was one of the centerpieces on display. Chen Xuanrong’s solo show is expected to be held  at Art+ during the months of November – December 2018.

Chen Zhiguang’s stainless steel robust and formidable sculpture of an ant was another highlight of the display. Chen Zhiguan’s ants can be individuals, as embodiments of Chen Zhiguang’s own personality, as a part of the collective whole, or as representatives of the Chinese people. In whichever variety, the ant reveals Chen Zhiguang’s strong desire to respect individuals, traditions, and lives.

 

Huang Yulong’s marked his appearance with the new series of works, entitled  “Snowflakes” . Hoping to reach the global communities through the international scene of the Art Central, Huang Yulong expressed his concern for the rising violence in the world by creating sculptures made of crystal gun-shaped fragments that when assembled together resemble a snowflake.

For the first time Art+ Shanghai Gallery has exhibited the works by a Sichuan artist He Jian, who along with a number of his contemporaries is now recognized as the new face of the Sichuan painting school. You can expect to see more of He Jian’s works during his first solo show at Art+ Shanghai Gallery in 2019.

Art+ Shanghai Gallery also brought to the fair the new phantasmagorical sticker mosaics by Ye Hongxing and bold and polemic conversations in oil on canvas by the Tamen+ collective.

Whether it is a social commentary, ironic conceptualization or a personal reflection, the pieces showcased by Art+ at the 4th edition of the Art Central were multidirectional and multi-meaningful, with each artist taking a different attitude, presenting a matter from one’s unique standpoint, and in a variety of media, some leaning towards the mysterious or subconscious, intuitive or metaphorical, while others towards something more aggressive and daring.

 

 

 

It is always amazing to realize that you can relate yourself to something big and important, especially when it is OLYMPIC-STANDARD-BIG!

Art+ Shanghai Gallery is incredibly proud to represent Korean artist KeySook Geum in Shanghai, Professor of Textile Arts and Fashion Design at Hongik University in Seoul, the artist who had the honor to create elegant costume designs for Korean Olympic athletes as well as costumes for medal-bearers and athlete escorts for PyeongChang Winter Olympic Games 2018!

What has caught the world’s attention were the “fairy outfits” of the placard bearers that led athletes of the participating countries into the Olympic stadium during the Parade of the Nations. Social media raved about the the snow Olympic fairies that seemed to have flown straight from the magic forest and marched together with the athletes, carrying the signs with countries’ names, that resembled more a tree branch or a magic wand.

The credit for the winter fairy-tale mood that was created during the Parade of the Nations and for the incredible impression little fairies made on the world goes to a Korean artist KeySook Geum, who has become widely known for the her exquisite dream-like sculptures of wire and beads.

With a strong background in fashion design and costuming, KeySook creates delicate silhouettes of women’s dresses that capture a sense of movements and fragility, chaos and a perfect order of the universe. As the crystals and wires of her sculptures catch a glimpse of light while suspended in the air, they start to glisten, playing with viewers’ imagination and casting intricate shadows on the ground. Read more about the artist and her sophisticated works here.

TimeOut Shanghai has put together a new list of art galleries to enjoy during your next winter art stroll on the Bund. We are happy and proud to have our group exhibition “I Will Be Your Eyes II: Little Narratives” recommended for a visit. We are looking forward to see you at the gallery this December for our final exhibition of the year. Read on for details of the entire art walk at TimeOut Shanghai.

We are glad to share with you Emesha Nagy’s newly launched website Trendeveavour that keeps a vigilant eye on Asian ever-evolving art, innovation and fashion scenes.  We thank Trendeavour for featuring Art+ Shanghai Gallery’s profile in the review on Shanghai’s exciting art districts.


Visit to Xiong Yanjun’s studio in Wuhu, Anhui, China (image courtesy of the gallery)

This November, Xiong Yanjun has joined Art+ Shanghai gallery as one of the represented artists.

“I am very glad to be able to represent Xiong Yanjun – a thinking artist who understands Chinese contemporary society and Chinese art scene in its full entirety and complexity, and moreover who is profoundly knowledgeable about the world’s art history and movements. In fact, this reflects in his oeuvre of works that possesses an incredible sense of dignity and serenity”, says the Founder and Art Director of Art+ Shanghai Gallery Ana Gonzalez.

Xiong Yanjun was born in the city of Liuan of Anhui province, China in 1977. He graduated from the Anhui Normal University and completed Master’s of Fine Arts in Nanjing University of Arts, Nanjing, China. Xiong is now teaching oil painting at the Anhui Normal University in Wuhu and works at his studio as a professional artist.


Xiong Yanjun, 2015-1017, mixed media, 2015, 170cm x 150cm

We are excited to feature Xiong Yanjun’s works for the first time at the gallery next year along with the paintings by Tianjin-based artist Fu Shuai and exquisite porcelain creations by Liu Xi. The first exhibition of 2018 “The Palpable Soul of Surface” is due to open on Sunday,  7th January 2018. 

Art+ Shanghai Gallery welcomed Art Historian Julie Chun and the ladies from the Shanghai Expatriate Association (SEA) for an intimate afternoon gathering with coffee and art.  Julie Chun talked with the directors and founders of Art+ Shanghai Gallery Ana Gonzalez and Agnes Cohade of their long journey in China and their practice of running a successful gallery for 10 years.

The event is a part of the “Celebrate 10” series launched by Julie  Chun to carry out in-depth critical discussions at 10 galleries in Shanghai that have successfully operated 10 years.

Art+ Shanghai Gallery has celebrated its 10th anniversary in October 2017. During these tough yet incredibly rewarding years, the gallery has discovered, promoted and closely worked with over a hundred of Chinese and Asian artists, participated in dozens of international art fairs. The gallery has curated a vast number of solo shows and group exhibitions in Shanghai that touched upon themes available to both local and international audiences. It has also curated exhibitions in Singapore, the United States and Europe through its network of partner galleries, hosted various music concerts, lectures, and seminars.

Founded by four partners who share a long passion and involvement in art, the gallery is run on a daily basis by Ana Gonzalez from Spain and Agnes Cohade from France. On the afternoon of December 1st, Ana and Agnes have shared insightful moments from the lives of foreign female gallery owners in China, and particularly in Shanghai.  Together with the guests and Art Historian Julie Chun, gallerinas, among many other questions, have discussed the changes that took place in the contemporary Chinese art market over the last decade, talked about the peculiar business of art fairs and compared various practices of operating galleries in China and abroad. Two gallery owners have also shared their experiences of discovering new talents and maintaining the relationship and continuing support for the represented artists of the gallery.

The conversation was followed by a guided walk through the exhibition “I Will Be Your Eyes II: Little Narratives” and completed with the discovery of the Art+ treasure box where the works of the gallery’s artists are dutifully stored.

Art+ Shanghai Gallery thanks Julie Chun and all the participating guests for the inspiring afternoon spent together and filled with pleasant memories, curious discoveries, and interesting observations.

A Korean-American art historian and a lecturer, Julie Chun is a welcomed guest and a loyal friend of Art+ Shanghai Gallery. Based in Shanghai since 2011, she serves as an Art Convener of the Royal Asiatic Society (RAS) China in Shanghai where she lectures regularly at art museums and galleries. She is an adjunct professor of Art History for Alliance for Global Education at Shanghai University of Finance and Economic and is a regular contributor to Yishu Journal of Contemporary Chinese Art. Stay tuned to learn about future talks and lectures by Julie Chun at Art+ Shanghai Gallery.


Art+ Shanghai gallerinas with the musicians of ensemble Etoile at the French Consulate in Shanghai

The PLUS  of Art+ Shanghai Gallery is its passion and continuous support for all forms of artistic expressions, with music being on top of the list along with art.

For those of you who have already attended some of the concerts at Art+ Shanghai Gallery, the lovely faces of the ensemble “Etoile”  will seem familiar. This time Etoile participated in a fund-raising event which mission was to raise awareness and provide support to orphans and abandoned children in deprived areas of China. The concert was organized under the roof of the French Consulate in Shanghai by a local NGO “Children of Madaifu” .

Comprised of contemporary Chinese musicians with international background, ensemble “Etoile” surprised the audience gathered under the roof of French Consulate with the night of musical extravaganza, performing on traditional Chinese and classical western instruments.


Ensemble ‘Etoile’

We are looking forward to welcoming the musicians at the gallery in January 2018. Stay tuned to be the first one to learn about the dates of the concert!

 


Mr. Eskenazi next to his newly collected painting Legends by Tamen+ (Image courtesy of the artists)

Art+ Shanghai Gallery is infinitely proud and excited to announce that the work by the gallery’s represented artist collective Tamen+ , has entered the collection of Giuseppe Eskenazi, one of the world’s most respected art dealers in Chinese and Oriental art.


Legends on view art Art+ Shanghai Gallery

The Eskenazi Gallery, that he and his father founded more than 50 years ago, works at the very top of the market, selling works and antiques to ambitious collectors and major museums around the world, including Musées Royaux d’Art et d’Histoire in Brussels, Musée des Arts Asiatiques, Nice, Louvre Abu Dhabi, British Museum in London, Art Institute of Chicago, Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, National Gallery of Australia in Canberra, Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto, Hong Kong Museum of Art, Shanghai Museum, just to name a few.


Tamen+, Legends, 125cm x 200cm, Acrylic on canvas, 2015

When purchasing the painting, Mr. Eskenazi, a real connoisseur of art, both Western and Oriental, has told the artists that he owns the artworks by every artist whose works were portrayed in the collected piece.


Tamen+ artist collective at  Art+ Shanghai Gallery booth at Art Central 2016 (Lai Shengyu on the left and Yang Xiaogang on the right)

Art+ Shanghai Gallery has been representing Tamen+ since 2009 and ever since the artist collective has been gaining the acknowledgment and respect among the art lovers and academia as one of the most groundbreaking, intriguing, intellectually challenging artists on the contemporary art scene in China and the world. Cynical Realism, Political Pop and Kitsch culture go long with humor, mockery and sharp but cleverly veiled criticism of various ideologies, all interweave into a fascinating melange of Tamen+ artistic practice.

It is truly a privilege to be the gallery that represents talented Tamen+, along with the other great Chinese contemporary artist. Stay tuned, as Tamen+ solo exhibition is coming in spring of 2018.

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